Jet aircraft interiors

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It all started when…

I was demonstrating my work during my MODA exhibit in 2010, a man who owned an aviation company approached me and asked, "Have you ever thought about working in aviation?  a week later I was at Duncan Aviation in Lincoln Nebraska getting a 3 day crash course in jet aircraft interiors.  They were looking for a new way to create and apply jet aircraft interiors. Little did I know that my, soon to be,  invention would lead me to uprooting myself and family, moving to Nebraska for a year, and working side-by-side with Duncan's engineers and designers to create a prototype that would pass the FAA's stringent 18G forward load case. This was the beginning of AIMS, short for Aircraft Interior Modular System.

 

A new way to jet aircraft interiors...

 
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When I arrived in Lincoln I met many of the engineers and designers. They were enlightening me on the intricacies of what makes the most high-end furniture in the world work. It was not long until I realized that the panel pin in conventional jet aircraft interior construction had to be removed. This panel pin has created a back pressure in advancements in this field for several decades now. So I got to work on the solution.

 
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I created the AIMS A1 prototype. Obviously not meant for flight, but it proved the novel concepts were feasible. After representative in completions visit my studio in Atlanta to see the A1 prototype we found ourselves the verge of new possibilities.

 

Weeks later, Driving a cargo van with the prototype in the back, I was headed for Lincoln Nebraska. I unloaded the prototype and presentation materials in hangar B. I gave my presentation to the engineers and designers of Duncan Aviation. A third of the engineers left shortly after the presentation, a third of the engineer scratched their heads and a third saw the possibilities and were immediately excited.

 

I created the AIMS A1 prototype. Obviously not meant for flight, but it proved the novel concepts were feasible. After representative in completions visit my studio in Atlanta to see the A1 prototype we found ourselves the verge of new possibilities.

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Weeks later, Driving a cargo van with the prototype in the back, I was headed for Lincoln Nebraska. I unloaded the prototype and presentation materials in hangar B. I gave my presentation to the engineers and designers of Duncan Aviation. A third of the engineers left shortly after the presentation, a third of the engineer scratched their heads and a third saw the possibilities and were immediately excited.